MRI uses a powerful magnet, radio waves, and a computer to produce images. These images help to evaluate how well areas of the body are functioning and to detect and treat different medical conditions.

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A CT scan quickly takes multiple images of internal organs, soft tissue, and other body parts. These images are then used to diagnose cancer and other internal diseases.

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Women’s Health goes beyond screening mammograms. Exams like DEXA bone density tests, OB Ultrasounds, and Breast Biopsy play a vital role in preventative health care.

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MRI
MRI - MRA

MRI

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Instead of using radiation to produce images of internal body structures like other exams, MRI uses a powerful magnet, radio waves, and a computer to produce the images. These images help to evaluate how well areas of the body are functioning and to detect and treat different medical conditions.

 

The MRI machine is a large tube with a moveable table that slides into the center of the tube. The outer portion of the tube houses the large magnet. MRI exams are painless; however, some patients may be uncomfortable remaining still for long periods of time and the closed-in space may be a bit claustrophobic for others. When the machine takes the images there will be rapid drumming sounds and some vibrations. Patients who have pacemakers, cochlear implants, and some types of clips used on brain aneurysms cannot go in the MRI scanning room as it can cause malfunctions of the equipment.

 

The images are read by our radiologist and a report is sent to your doctor in a timely manner.


Resource

WWW.RADIOLOGYINFO.ORG

 

MRA

Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

MRA is just like an MRI in that it uses a powerful magnet, radio waves, and a computer to produce images of the body. The difference is that an MRA looks at the movement of blood through key blood vessels and arteries in the body, such as the brain, neck, kidneys, and chest. This allows the doctor to determine if there is any kind of blockage or enlargement which could be dangerous for the patient.

 

The MRA machine is a large tube with a moveable table that slides into the center of the tube. The outer portion of the tube houses the large magnet. MRA exams are painless; however, some patients may be uncomfortable remaining still for long periods of time and the closed-in space may be a bit claustrophobic for others. When the machine takes the images there will be rapid drumming sounds and some vibrations. Patients who have pacemakers, cochlear implants, and some types of clips used on brain aneurysms cannot go in the MRA scanning room as it can cause malfunctions of the equipment.

 

The images are read by our radiologist and a report is sent to your doctor in a timely manner.


Resource

WWW.RADIOLOGYINFO.ORG


FAQs

Does California Imaging & Diagnostics have an open MRI?

Yes. CID does have an open MRI that can withstand up to 500 pounds.

 

Does my head have to go in the scanner?

If you are having a brain, cervical spine, or shoulder MRI your head will have to go into the scanner. If you are having an exam anywhere from the hips up you will have to go in the scanner.

 

What happens if the electricity goes off?

The table has a manual override that enables it to unlock and bring you out of the scanner.

 

Where will you be while I’m in the scanner?

The technologist will be just outside the scanner door at the opening console. The technologist will also be in visual contact with you through the glass during your exam.

 

How will you know if I need you?

The technologist will be in contact with you throughout the test. You will also have a call button.

 

Why do I have to have contrast?

Contrast may enhance the images and gives the radiologist more detailed information about your exam.

 

Will the contrast make me sick?

It is very unlikely that the contrast will make you sick. The only thing you should feel is coolness at the injection site.

 

Can we do the test without contrast?

Yes we can do the test without contrast. However, specific information that your physician wants may not be able to be obtained by doing the test without contrast. The test could be inconclusive.

 

Will I be able to drive after the exam?

Yes, you will be able to drive after the exam, as long as you did not have to take an oral sedative for your exam.

 

Do I have to hold my breath the whole time I’m in the machine?

No, you do not need to hold your breath the whole time of the exam. However, you may be asked to hold your breath for specific exams for a period of 30 seconds or less as we are obtaining the images.

 

Can you scan my head without putting it in the head coil?

No, we cannot scan your head without putting it in the head coil. It is the antenna in the coil that picks up the signal to create the images of your brain.

MRI Prep

Patient Preparations for MRI

MRI without contrast

The patient cannot have a pacemaker or defibrillator. Please do not wear jewelry, with the exception of a wedding ring. Please wear clothing that is free of metal (e.g. zippers, snaps, etc.) No patient preparation is required.

 

MRI with contrast

The patient cannot have a pacemaker or defibrillator. Please do not wear jewelry, with the exception of a wedding ring. Please wear clothing that is free of metal (e.g. zippers, snaps, etc.) The patient must be well hydrated (water only). If patient is over 55, is diabetic, or has history of renal failure, labs must be obtained within 30 days of exam date. GFR level must be greater than 59.

MRA Prep

MR ARTHROGRAM

The patient cannot have a pacemaker or defibrillator. The patient will have a fluoroscopy exam 30 minutes prior to an MRI. Please do not wear jewelry, with the exception of a wedding ring. Please wear clothing that is free of metal (e.g. zippers, snaps, etc.) No patient preparation is required.

 
MRI